Student Loan Limits – What You Need to Know

Student Loans Limits

Federal student loan limits may make it difficult to pay for college. Understanding these limits can help you determine other financial options. Private student loans are another option that may allow you to cover the entire cost of attending school. In some cases, they are even available for those with no dependents. To find out if you qualify for student loans, read our guide. Below we’ve outlined the maximum amount that you can borrow based on your age and the type of loan you need.

Student loan limits increase from $5,500 for freshmen to $6,500 for sophomores to $7,500 for juniors and seniors

The maximum amount a student can borrow is determined by the year they start college and the type of loan they qualify for. Undergraduates can borrow up to $12,500 a year or $57,500 for a total federal student loan. Graduate students can borrow up to $20,500 per year or $138,500 total. Calculate how much money you need for college based on your anticipated income. Try to borrow just below the maximum amount.

Federal student loan limits adjust based on dependents

Depending on the type of student you are, federal student loan limits can vary greatly. The federal student loan limits for undergraduates range from $5,500 to $7,500 for an independent student to $31,000 for students with dependents. These limits also apply to the federal parent-child PLUS loan program. For each of these programs, the federal student loan limits adjust based on the type of student. The maximum amount of unsubsidized loans is $20,500 for undergraduates, and it is $138,500 for graduate students.

Type of loan

The Type of Student Loan that is best for you depends on your financial need and the length of time you plan to attend school. Direct Subsidized Loans are available for undergraduates and graduate students with financial need. The government pays the interest on subsidized loans while you are in school, and during deferment and grace periods. Unsubsidized loans are for students who do not demonstrate need, but need financial assistance. In either case, the amount of interest you owe cannot exceed the cost of attendance.

Year you’re in school

For the purposes of calculating your student loan limits, the minimum period of enrollment is the length of your academic year or the length of your clock-hour program. Unless you are enrolled in a non-term program, you cannot borrow more than the amount of your program’s academic year limit. There are exceptions to this rule, such as if you transfer schools or leave one program to enroll in another.

Interest rates

Various types of federal loans have different rates and loan limits. Federal Stafford loans, for example, don’t require financial need and are available to undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree students. The federal government charges a 1.057 percent fee for these loans. These loans can be obtained after Oct. 1 of this year but before Oct. 1 of 2022. Federal Stafford loans are subsidized by the U.S. Department of Education during the six-month grace period. In the regular repayment period, the borrower pays the interest. A lifetime maximum amount is $23,000 for federal Stafford loans.

Private student loan options

Undergraduate and graduate students, in general, are allowed to borrow less money than undergraduates. This is because graduate-level education is generally more expensive, and older students are less likely to have financial support from their parents. In some cases, the government will even pay the interest charges on a student’s private student loan. However, students should consider the loan limits when choosing a student loan. These limits apply to both federal and private loans.

Student Loans – One-Fourth of Borrowers Default Within 20 Years of Starting College

Student Loans 20 Years

Statistics show that one-fourth of borrowers default on their student loans within 20 years of starting college. What are the options for paying off your student loans? There are several different repayment plans available, including a 10-year graduated plan and an Income-based plan. The article will explain each option in detail. After you understand each one, you should be able to make an informed decision about which is right for you. You can also use the information below to find the best student loan payment option for your specific situation.

One-fourth defaulted on student loans within 20 years of beginning college

Recent data shows that one-fourth of students who started college in 1995 or 1996 had defaulted on their federal student loans by the time they were 20. Even if the students never defaulted, they were still in repayment more than a decade after they graduated. And about half of these students were black male. The statistics are even worse for students of color.

However, this number is still quite alarming. Even though defaulters have a high risk of defaulting on their student loans, they are typically well-educated and capable of fulfilling a full-time job. To understand the causes of defaults, institutions should examine why students drop out. Then, policymakers should compare default rates by reason for leaving school.

Standard repayment plan

If you are currently paying off a $60,000 student loan, the standard repayment plan is for 20 years. This plan requires monthly payments of about $183 to $103 of discretionary income. After 20 years, the remaining balance is forgiven. The repayment plan is based on a 10 percent monthly payment limit for the first 20 years, which increases as your income grows. After that, your loan balance is forgiven and the remaining amount may be taxable income.

Federal student loans are placed on a Standard Repayment Plan. This repayment plan allows you to make payments in equal amounts over a decade. You will end up paying less interest than with other federal repayment plans. The repayment plan is automatically assigned when you enter repayment. You can choose between two options: income-driven and standard repayment. Income-driven plans are better suited for people who struggle to make their payments on time or have low incomes.

10-year graduated repayment plan

The 10 year graduated repayment plan for student loans is a plan that allows you to make smaller payments now while paying more later. It is an ideal plan for those who want a 10-year timeline for repayment. In addition, you can also consolidate your student loans into one loan and use a longer payment period. However, if you don’t have any strategy in place, you may find the 10-year plan to be too expensive to handle.

A 10-year graduated repayment plan is a great choice for those who have limited income and will only be earning a small amount for the next several years. Since the total interest cost is higher in the long run, the monthly payments will rise gradually as time passes. The repayment term is typically 10 years but can be extended up to 25 years for some loans. However, you will only qualify for a 10-year plan if you borrowed more than $30,000.

Income-based repayment

The new government program, known as the Income-Based Repayment (IBR), will allow borrowers to pay back their loans largely if they are unable to make their payments. This program is based on the borrowers’ income and promises them a debt-free future after 20 or 25 years. However, it is important to note that this plan only applies to new borrowers who started making payments after July 1, 2014.

The income-driven repayment plan allows people to make payments based on their income and are re-evaluated every year. The payment amount is capped at 10% of discretionary income after July 1, 2014, or 15% before July 1, 2014. The repayment period may be extended to 20 or 25 years depending on your income and family size, but the forgiven balance is taxable at this time. Income-driven repayment plans are available to undergraduate and graduate students. Students can change their plans at any time.

How to Qualify For Private Student Loans

Student Loans Private

Private student loans are available to those with poor credit. If you have a low credit score, you should avoid applying for private student loans and work towards improving your credit score. If you cannot improve your credit score, you can always apply with a co-signer. Here are some tips to help you qualify for a private student loan. It’s important to understand the minimum credit score requirement before applying for one. You can also learn about repayment options and borrow up to 80% of your income.

Minimum credit score

While there is no exact minimum credit score for private student loans, there are some guidelines that must be met. One of them is a high annual income. This will help private lenders determine whether the student can afford to pay back the loan on time. Students with excellent credit and a steady income are often eligible for private loans, but if their income falls below a certain level, they may need a cosigner. The minimum income requirement for private student loans varies by lender.

Repayment options

While federal loans have fixed payment schedules, private student loans have different repayment options. In-school repayment options include fixed or interest-only payments, and deferred payments. Deferred payments start after the grace period expires. Repayment periods can last anywhere from five to twenty years. Some lenders have multiple repayment plans to accommodate varying income levels and financial situations. Listed below are some common repayment options for private student loans.

Fees

There are various fees associated with private student loans. These can vary depending on the type of loan. For instance, some variable-rate loans have higher initial interest rates than others. Moreover, different lenders may have different eligibility requirements. This means you should do your homework before applying. You should also be aware of interest capitalization, which is not a fee. However, it can affect the overall cost of the loan. Read on to learn more.

Borrowing limits

Federal and private student loan borrowing limits vary depending on the type of loan and the year of school. Federal loans have lower interest rates and more repayment options than private student loans, and the amount of money that you can borrow each year depends on how much you plan to earn during your education. You should know how to find out the limits on your specific loan. You may also want to take into account the cumulative and annual loan limits as well.

Cosigner requirements

Cosigner requirements for private student loans are as important as the loan itself. Depending on the lender, a cosigner can be a family member, an unrelated adult, or even a co-worker. While a cosigner does not have to be a blood relative, they must have a good credit history and a strong relationship with the applicant. They should also be over the age of majority in the state where they reside.

Student Loans Repayment Calculator

Student Loans Repayment Calculator

A student loan repayment calculator can help you determine how long it will take to repay your loans. This calculator uses the same monthly repayment amounts for every loan. However, it does not take into account loan fees. Student loan repayment can be complex, so the calculator is helpful for determining the amount of money that you need to pay. It is important to understand all options available, as these may differ. For instance, you can use a payment as you earn plan to make your monthly payments.

Pay as you earn plan

Income-driven student loan repayment plans have several benefits, but some are more beneficial than others. For example, the Pay As You Earn student loan repayment plan caps payments at ten percent of discretionary income, and after 20 years, the remaining balance will be forgiven. Pay As You Earn is especially beneficial for borrowers who are married, have two incomes, or have low earning potential. However, it isn’t for everyone. For example, you might need to be in college for a long time before you can afford to pay back your loans.

Debt snowball method

One of the benefits of the debt snowball method is that you can get rid of a substantial amount of debt within a short period of time. This method can help you eliminate as many as $20,000 of debt within the first 27 months. The key to making this method work is focusing on small debts first and working towards a large amount. You can pay off a large amount of debt quickly if you are able to afford the payments.

Interest capitalization method

Interest capitalization is a form of loan amortization that adds the interest you owe on top of the principal balance. Students usually postpone payments of their student loans during their college years and for six months after graduation. At the end of that grace period, the unpaid interest will be added to the balance, and you’ll begin accruing interest charges. The more you defer your payments, the higher your interest costs will be.

Monthly payment

If you want to reduce your monthly student loan payments, you must learn more about your repayment options. Student loans vary in terms of interest rates, monthly payment, and loan balance, and each borrower is different. Some loans have higher minimum payments, while others have lower minimums. Regardless of your situation, managing your debt is possible. Here are tips for making a manageable monthly payment. Keep in mind, though, that your monthly payment will depend on the balance and interest rate of your loans, as well as the loan repayment term.

Grace period

If you are looking to save money while paying off your student loans, you should use a student loan repayment calculator. You’ll be able to calculate how much money you’ll need to repay your loan and how much interest you’ll accrue during this period. You’ll also see how much of a difference the grace period will make in your overall debt. The longer you wait to start paying off your loans, the more you’ll end up paying.

How to Use a Student Loans Calculator

Student Loans Calculator

If you have recently obtained a student loan, you’ve probably wondered what the monthly payment will be. Thankfully, there’s a Student Loans Calculator available to help you calculate how long it will take you to pay off your loan. You can use this tool to determine how much you’ll owe each month and the interest rate. There are also a variety of other factors that you can enter into the Student Loans Calculator, such as the length of your grace period and any prepayment penalties.

Calculate your loan amount

One way to keep track of your student loan debt is to calculate the interest rate. Interest rates can vary greatly depending on the type of loan, the term, and your credit score. If you don’t know your current interest rate, you can use a loan calculator to figure out your monthly payment. To calculate your loan balance, enter your loan balance and interest rate into the calculator. Then, input the remaining balance to determine your monthly payments.

The calculator will estimate the monthly payments based on the interest rate and other fees. The actual payment amount will depend on the type of loan, interest rate, and repayment terms. Most student loan programs require a minimum payment of $50 a month. The loan term also depends on the interest rate, which can be set to 120 months with a 6.8 percent interest rate. By entering all of the information you receive, you can figure out how much you owe and how long you’ll have to pay it back.

Calculate your monthly payment

A calculator can be used to determine a student loan‘s monthly payment. The repayment amount is based on the amount of money borrowed, the interest rate, and the length of the loan. However, it is essential to note that these numbers may vary from person to person. You may be able to reduce your monthly payment by making additional payments or consolidating student loans. However, if you’re not able to afford the monthly payments, you may want to consider other options, such as paying off the interest instead of making the loan.

A student loan calculator should be able to calculate the total payment amount, interest, and extra payments you may be eligible for. Some student loan calculators even allow you to make regular or one-time payments. Once you’ve entered the information, the tool will provide you with a payment summary in the form of a table and two charts. You can also choose an amortization schedule to view your payments. The calculator will calculate the interest you’ll need to pay each month and the total amount you’ll be required to pay in six months.

Calculate your interest rate

If you’re in college and have student loans, it’s a good idea to figure out how much your monthly payments will cost. To calculate your interest rate, divide your loan balance by the interest rate factor (also known as the interest rate factor per day) and multiply by 365 days. A typical student loan balance is $50,000, so you would pay $8 per day, or $240 per month. For a more accurate estimate, you can use a student loan calculator to calculate your interest rate.

Student loans are long-term commitments. The interest rate is the amount you owe the lender for the money. In the case of a fixed-rate loan, your interest rate will remain the same throughout the loan. A variable-rate loan charges interest on both the principal and any accumulated interest, resulting in a higher total interest charge over the course of time. This is the case with private student loans, which typically charge variable interest rates.

Calculate your grace period

Before you start making payments on your student loans, it is important to know how long your grace period will be. This will help you avoid overpaying for your loans by allowing you some breathing room to find a job or make a move. You can even consider making the payment before the grace period ends to save on interest and pay off your loans early. To calculate your grace period, visit Student Loan Hero’s website and enter the information requested to get a free estimate of your monthly payments.

It’s also helpful to know the exact number of months your loan grace period will last. If your payment period is very long, you may be able to avoid making payments altogether. A student loan servicer will notify you of the grace period expiration date and offer you options for reducing your monthly payments. In addition, the servicer will collect your payments and manage your repayment plan. If you’re still unsure, you can consult your lender to learn more about repayment plans. In some cases, loan servicers will offer income-driven repayment plans, which you may qualify for.

Student Loans in Deferment and Forbearance

You may be eligible for a student loan deferment program. To begin, you must contact your loan servicer and check your most recent statement. You can also apply for a deferment program through the Federal Student Assistance program. Once you have received this information, submit the necessary paperwork and documentation. Be sure to continue making payments until the deferment is approved. If you stop making payments before the deferment period is complete, you may default on your credit.

Forbearance

A forbearance for student loans in deferments is a form of repayment relief that allows borrowers to temporarily stop making payments on their loans. While the deferment period lasts for one to three years, there is no time limit for the period to be renewed. The length of forbearance is based on the borrower’s financial situation. Federal loans, for instance, are eligible for a six-month forbearance while private loans are not subject to a time limit.

Students who are facing financial difficulty can seek forbearance from their lender. The loan servicer must grant deferment to borrowers. For subsidized federal student loans, borrowers must continue to attend school for at least half time. For private loans, however, interest will still accrue during the period, and will be capitalized when not paid. However, forbearance is often more affordable than the interest on payday loans and personal loans.

Deferment

Deferment and forbearance are two options for students to consider. Each has pros and cons and should be discussed with your loan servicer. While deferment may seem like a great idea, it is important to realize that you still need to make your payments while you’re in the deferment period. Keeping in touch with your loan servicer will help you keep your financial situation in good standing and avoid future issues with your student loans.

If you’re unable to pay your student loans, deferment may be the best option for you. If you’re unable to make your monthly payments because of a financial hardship, deferment will postpone the interest and principal portion of your loan until you can afford to make them. However, it’s important to note that deferment doesn’t eliminate the need to pay the loan principal.

Income-driven repayment

Streamlining existing income-driven plans reduces the administrative burden for borrowers and simplifies program implementation and communication. Nevertheless, the program should retain the fixed payment option to account for borrowers’ varying repayment preferences. The Department of Housing and Urban Development has not proactively shared this information. Whether or not you qualify for an income-driven repayment plan depends on your circumstances. If you qualify for an income-driven repayment plan, the next step is to apply.

In order to qualify for income-driven repayment, you must recertify your income and family size once a year. However, you can choose to submit alternative documentation to provide your servicer with a copy of your latest pay stub. If you don’t have any income, you can also indicate that you do not have any. Neither plan offers loan forgiveness, and you must recertify your income every year.

Refinancing

Refinancing student loans is an excellent way to reduce your monthly payments and get a lower interest rate. If you’re currently in deferment, you might qualify to apply for a refinancing loan. However, you should know that you’ll likely have to provide a cosigner or have a good credit history in order to be approved. Those with good credit will often qualify for a lower rate, but people with bad credit won’t have as much luck.

Refinancing your student loans in deferment is usually beneficial only if you can find a better deal with a different lender. This better deal will almost always be in the form of a lower interest rate. It may also be an attractive option if switching will allow you to lock in a lower interest rate and reduce your monthly payment. Of course, you’ll have to take into account any origination fees you may have to pay, which you should take into consideration before proceeding.

How to Improve Your Student Loans Credit Score

Student Loans Credit Score

A credit score that has less than perfect credit can still be improved by paying off your student loans on time. However, this process will require some time and effort. The sooner you pay off your student loans, the better, as your credit score will increase over time. The following are ways to improve your student loan credit score. Read on to learn more. Here are some tips for achieving better credit:

Paying bills on time

One of the most overlooked ways to improve your student loan credit score is by paying your loans on time. While late fees and late payments hurt your score, they will have minimal effects if you make your payments on time. In addition, your payment history will increase your FICO score. That’s great news if you’re planning to get a loan in the future. But what if you have a high-interest student loan?

When you make timely payments on your student loans, you’ll significantly boost your credit score. Since 35 percent of your score is based on your payment history, even the slightest late payment can hurt your score. Delinquencies and late payments can damage your credit score and make it difficult to get approved for other loans. To avoid this, pay your loans on time and avoid missing them. In some cases, you may be able to get approved for another loan if your student loan debt is low.

Debt-to-income ratio

The average student loan borrower has a debt-to-income ratio (DTI) of about 13%, leaving little room for debt growth. Student loans can be especially burdensome for borrowers because they take up a large chunk of their monthly income, and this makes them look like dangerous propositions to lenders. To make matters worse, many students may choose a less expensive school, thereby increasing their DTI.

Your debt-to-income ratio is a way to assess your creditworthiness. By keeping your debts to a reasonable level, you can borrow for college, refinance your student loans, buy a car, and get a mortgage. A good DTI is around 35%. Most mortgage lenders will want to see this figure around 43 percent. A good DTI is always better than a bad one, but there are some things you can do to make it better. You can calculate your DTI by pulling your credit report.

Refinancing student loans with bad credit

Refinancing student loans with bad credits is possible, but there are many factors you need to keep in mind before you apply for a loan. First and foremost, you must make all payments on time. Your score will depend on your payment history, and the longer your credit history, the better. Secondly, your credit score will be affected by major issues such as bankruptcy or foreclosure. Thirdly, the higher your debt is, the more negative points you will accrue.

Fortunately, refinancing student loans with bad credit is still possible, and you can reduce your monthly payment with some help from a co-signer. While many lenders allow co-signers, some, like Earnest, don’t. If you do opt to use a co-signer, your loan will be reflected on your co-signer’s credit report. That means lenders will consider your refinanced loan as part of their overall debt load. Any missed payments will negatively impact the co-signer’s credit score, and if you’re unable to make payments, the co-signer will be required to pay.

Student Loans Deferred Again – Good News For Defaulters

There’s good news for students in default on federal student loans. Under the Biden administration, they will be allowed to resume payments without incurring late fees. The pause will end in 10 months, but collections won’t resume until that time. The Education Department requires borrowers to work with default-focused loan servicing companies to find affordable payment plans. Once approved, borrowers must make nine affordable payments within 20 days of their due date, over a period of ten consecutive months. During this pause, borrowers must coordinate with a default-focused loan servicing company to make their nine affordable monthly payments. The Biden administration will waive the rehabilitation process for borrowers who are eligible to borrow up to $7,000 from the federal government.

Interest is waived on student loans

If you’ve received a federal student loan, you’re probably aware of the zero percent interest rate. The interest waiver will end on Aug. 31. However, it doesn’t take effect until then. Many lenders have already lowered interest rates and are offering refinancing options to students. Those with high interest debt will also benefit from this program, as the waiver is available to all borrowers regardless of their credit history.

The suspension of involuntary collections for defaulted student loans has been extended by the Biden administration through January 31, 2022. Previously, the paused payments were scheduled to expire on March 31, 2020. This program is intended to help defrauded borrowers avoid foreclosure by waiving their interest. It also applies to Federal Family Education Loans, which are serviced by a commercial lender. However, there are certain conditions to the loan forbearance program.

Payments have been paused since March 2020

Biden is facing mounting pressure from consumer advocates and other Democrats to extend the pause. He has promised to extend the pause through the end of this year, but many experts expect him to issue another extension in the coming months. The pause is currently only applicable to Direct Loans and PLUS loans, which are made to graduate students and parents on behalf of their children. Federal Family Education Loans are not affected.

During the pause, the Department of Education will allow borrowers who are in default to have a fresh start in their repayment. The pause is meant to erase the negative impact of default and delinquency, so borrowers can enter repayment with a clean slate. Previously, the department said that borrowers should receive a billing statement at least 21 days before their next payment is due. However, borrowers who are on auto-payment plans should contact their loan servicing company to make sure they do not miss a payment.

Extensions to Jan. 31, 2021

The White House on Tuesday signaled that another extension was on the way after the Education Department instructed student loan servicers to stop sending notices to borrowers about a May resumption. That means students can stop paying their loans until the government deems them eligible to start repaying them. The decision to extend the student loan repayment moratorium is a positive step for students, but it does not go far enough to solve the nation’s student loan crisis.

As a result of this latest action, borrowers with federal student loans will continue to enjoy the same benefits as those who are currently under forbearance. Interest will not accrue on the loans for the next 2.5 years, and wage garnishment will not be used to reduce their tax refunds. The extension will also help federal borrowers avoid delinquency and defaults. Moreover, the Department of Education will continue to offer loan relief to borrowers who have been defrauded by their financial institutions.

Student Loans Vs Personal Loans

While students usually think of college as a low-expenditure period, college expenses are often higher than what is covered by a student loan. While student loans are intended to cover educational costs, they do not cover basic living expenses, such as food and lodging. Often students do not have sufficient funds to pay for their rent or other expenses, and personal loans are the next logical step. Student loans are protected by the federal government, and interest rates are lower. Students who take out a personal loan must pay the loan back immediately, however.

Student loans are protected by the federal government

Most student loans are held by a lender, quasi-governmental agency, or third-party loan servicing company, rather than the federal government. Although the federal government protects the government-backed loans, private loans are less favorable. They typically carry higher interest rates and fees, and are not dischargeable through bankruptcy. There are no loan limits for private loans, and the interest rate is higher than on federal loans. In addition, private student loans may have higher loan fees and penalties.

They have lower interest rates

Aside from being more affordable, student loans also offer higher flexibility. Instead of repaying the loan in one lump sum, you can pay it back over a period of time in installments, each consisting of both interest and principal. You may be able to defer payment if your monthly income is low, but not all private lenders offer this option. Personal loans may be an option if you have an unexpected emergency that requires you to pay back a large sum of money in a short period of time.

They offer deferred payments

A deferred payment plan is one way of extending a credit line. Sometimes, a creditor offers a deferred payment plan for the first six months of a new customer’s account. In this case, the customer only pays interest on the credit card balance during this period and then makes regular payments after that. The deferred payment plan may be a great way for a creditor to attract new customers.

They are easier to discharge than other consumer debts

Bankruptcy is often used to eliminate other types of debt, including credit card bills, but student loans are harder to eliminate. Despite being easier to discharge than other consumer debts, they are also not completely wiped out. Although most consumer debts are non-dischargeable, student loans aren’t. In fact, they are among the few debts that can’t be eliminated through bankruptcy.

Everything You Need to Know Before Taking Out Student Loan Debt – Student Loans Explained 2020

Everything You Need to Know Before Taking Out Student Loan Debt – Student Loans Explained 2020 Finally making a video covering everything you need to know before taking out student loan debt. I graduated with $50k worth of college debt,…

Everything You Need to Know Before Taking Out Student Loan Debt – Student Loans Explained 2020

Finally making a video covering everything you need to know before taking out student loan debt. I graduated with $50k worth of college debt, and have been documenting my journey paying off debt ever since. There’s so much info about student debt that no one teaches you in school, so this video is going to cover everything I wish I knew before taking out student loans. This is a ‘student loan debt explained’ intro video to anyone who is having trouble understanding how student loans work, how much student loans do I need to take out, how student loan interests rates work, etc. I also explain the difference between government vs private loans for college, and which ones are better.

Let me know if you have any questions or want to see a part two on paying off student loan debt!

0:00-1:08 intro
1:08 student loan basics
2:32 government loans
6:45 private loans
9:18 how much should you borrow

WATCH NEXT –

STUDENT LOANS –

How to Know if You SHOULD Take Out Student Loans – https://youtu.be/CcqAGDZy-j8

How to Avoid Student Loans – https://youtu.be/0f6p5OvruXI

GETTING A DEGREE –

My College Degree is Useless | What I Wish I Knew Before Getting in Student Loan Debt – https://youtu.be/1U8JIGaoM9Q

Which College Degrees Are Worth It in 2020 | Majors Worth the Student Loan Debt – https://youtu.be/TkyJlY5xS7Y

Degrees NOT Worth the Student Loan Debt – https://youtu.be/3oooMWSP_JY

MAKING MONEY –
7 EASY Ways to Make Money in College – https://youtu.be/BKH0mSWz2H0

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CONTACT ME –
Book a 1 on 1 Call with Me for College & Career Planning – https://bit.ly/2MaYgm9
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Email – bylynetteadkins@gmail.com
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