Student Loans Forbearance – What Are Your Options?

Student Loans Forbearance

There are a variety of student loan forbearance options available. Read on for details about the options available to you and the costs. Whether you are a student or a borrower, knowing your options is important. If you want to find the best option, you need to know what your options are.

Borrowers

If you’ve graduated from college and accumulated significant debt, you may qualify for student loan forgiveness. The federal government has opened a program for borrowers who don’t meet their payment obligations. It will initially be available online. If you meet eligibility requirements, you can expect to be free of your debt in four to six weeks.

To apply, borrowers must fill out an online application. The application will be available in October. A paper version will be available later. The government estimates that as many as 8 million borrowers are eligible. The application is expected to be simple to complete. This is because the government already has the information needed to determine the eligibility of borrowers. The Department of Education uses information from FAFSA forms and income-driven repayment applications to determine which borrowers are eligible for loan forgiveness.

Alternatives

Student loan forbearance is a helpful option for borrowers who are having trouble making payments due to high interest rates or other problems. However, it cannot be used by borrowers who have defaulted on their loans. If you find yourself in this situation, you may want to consider student loan refinancing. This option allows you to get a lower interest rate on your loans, along with flexible terms and repayment options.

The main advantage of forbearance is that it lowers your monthly payments for a short period of time. However, the downside to it is that you’ll end up paying more money in the long run because you’ll be paying interest rather than principal. In addition, forbearance also causes your loan balance to increase, as you continue to accumulate interest on it.

Costs

The costs of student loan forbearance have been the subject of much debate. According to one estimate, it could cost nearly $1 trillion in the next decade. This cost is projected to fall primarily on lower-income households, where two-thirds of the benefits will go. Even though the federal government has been trying to reduce the cost of student loans, critics point out that the policy is not cost-free.

While forbearance may provide some breathing room, it is a short-term fix and can have serious consequences. The constant renewal of forbearance can damage your credit score and cause the loan to default. During the forbearance period, there is no limit to the number of times you can apply, so you can use it for as long as you need. However, be aware of the costs and be prepared to pay for it, as it adds up over time. For example, if you were in forbearance for 12 months, the interest would amount to $1,800. By the end of the term, you would owe $31,800.

Getting a forbearance

If you’re having trouble making payments on your student loans, you may be able to get a forbearance from your lender. This is a temporary suspension of payments, usually for up to 12 months. However, it’s important to remember that forbearance is not a permanent solution, and you may need to reapply after your current forbearance has expired.

When you apply for a forbearance, make sure that you fully understand what it entails. For example, a temporary job loss, injury, or low income can be grounds for a forbearance. However, a forbearance will not erase your past due payments. This is why it’s best to apply for one before you’ve missed many payments.

Stop Student Loans Collections

Student Loans Collections

Student debts can be difficult to pay off, but there are ways to stop collection efforts. One way is to send a formal request to stop phone calls and mail from a collection agency. This request stops phone calls and mail, but it doesn’t prevent the loan holder from transferring your account or filing a lawsuit. In addition, you can try to get a silent phone to give you peace of mind.

Unwieldy collection system

There is a growing concern among advocacy groups that the Trump administration is mismanaging the student debt collection system. With thousands of borrowers facing the prospect of missing paychecks or being denied pay, this is a significant problem. However, the ED is taking action to correct the situation, including erasing debt. One program – the PSLF program – will forgive student loan debt for borrowers who are in public service, are disabled, or were defrauded by predatory for-profit schools.

A new letter from 12 Senate Democrats urging the Education Department to eliminate the use of private collection agencies is aimed at shedding light on the problem. It notes that more than seven million former undergraduates and graduate students have fallen behind on their federal student loans. Meanwhile, taxpayers are footing the bill for millions of dollars in collection fees and commissions. Moreover, this system does little to promote long-term repayment success for borrowers who manage to get out of default. Further, it exacerbates the problems faced by students who dropped out of college or who are people of color.

Costs of collection efforts

Student loan collection efforts can be costly, but there are several options available to minimize the amount you have to pay. One option is to make voluntary payments to the government. However, this is often not practical. If you cannot make voluntary payments, the government can garnish your wages. This is one option, but it’s not a good option. Depending on the method, it can cost you as much as half of what you owe.

Another option is to use a third-party collection agency, which charges a fraction of the amount owed. This approach is also less costly for the taxpayers. Private collection agencies are less expensive than the government, so it makes sense to use them. However, the cost of these services must be justified and the federal government should do everything it can to reduce them.

Depending on your loan type, the Department of Education can charge up to 25 percent in collection fees. However, this percentage can be lower if the loan is consolidated through an educational loan consolidation service.

Steps to avoid collection efforts

If you are in default on your student loans, you must take steps to avoid the collection efforts of your lender. Those efforts are often extremely powerful and can trap you from going back to school. First of all, you must be aware of your rights and be prepared to fight them. Make sure you understand the types of loans you have, how much each one is, and how to get in touch with your loan servicers.

If you have a federal student loan, the federal government has extraordinary powers to collect it. They can garnish your wages without a court order, take a portion of your Social Security payments, or even garnish your tax refund. In addition, there is no time limit on the collection of these loans.

Defaulting on your student loans can be devastating to your credit score and your ability to obtain credit in the future. It can also prevent you from receiving additional student loans or receiving federal aid. Your school can also withhold your transcript until the debt is paid.

Contacting a collection agency

If you’re behind on your student loan payments, you may receive phone calls from a collection agency asking for repayment details. While a debt collector’s goal is to collect a debt, you can stop them from harassing or threatening you. You can also file a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

You can stop the collection agency from calling you by filing for bankruptcy or a consumer proposal. However, the federal government’s student loan rehabilitation program only works with up-to-date student loans. If you’re more than nine months behind on your payments, it’s unlikely that you’ll be able to catch up. Fortunately, the federal government has a repayment assistance program known as Repayment Assistance Plan, which helps people who have fallen behind on their monthly payments. You can also get help from a Licensed Insolvency Trustee.

You should also consider your rights under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA), which limits debt collectors from making unsolicited calls. If you are in the military, you can use the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act to reduce your interest rate on your student loan. Another federal law, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, governs collection agencies and makes sure they follow ethical guidelines. However, if a collection agency contacts you after sending you a letter, it is violating the FDCPA and could result in a lawsuit for damages and legal fees.

Student Loans Lawsuit Settlement Announcement

Student Loans Lawsuit

A recent announcement in the Student Loans Lawsuit industry announced that Navient Corp. will pay off $1.7 billion in student loans and reform their business practices. As part of the settlement, students will receive 30% of the settlement. The announcement has for-profit college leaders furious. It will mean that students can get their money back without having to pay the debt, but what about Navient’s other practices?

Navient Corp. will cancel $1.7 billion in student loan debt

The announcement by Navient comes after a long investigation into its practices. Navient had been under fire for misleading borrowers into long-term forbearance plans, which may end up trapping borrowers deeper in debt. Forbearances allow borrowers to rebuild their finances, but the interest on the loans continues to accrue, making monthly payments higher over the life of the loan. Despite the investigation, Navient continued to deny wrongdoing and opted to settle the matter out of court. This prevented the distraction, expense, and burden of a court case.

The settlement also involves $95 million in restitution payments for borrowers affected by Navient’s shoddy loan practices. These funds will go to the 350,000 federal loan borrowers who had been in long-term forbearances and were affected by the company’s practices.

Navient’s agreement means that borrowers will not pay off their loans until January 2019. In addition to the money that will be wiped from the books, borrowers will receive billing notices three weeks before their first payment is due. These payments won’t be repaid in full, and borrowers will continue to make payments to Navient for years to come.

Navient will reform conduct in servicing and collecting student loans

The settlement with the Department of Education requires Navient to reform its conduct in servicing and collecting student loans, bringing the company in line with the federal government’s standards. This includes a commitment to prevent unfair practices and to provide consumers with accurate information about repayment options. It also requires Navient to eliminate some fees and train specialists to provide borrowers with proper advice.

The settlement also requires Navient to reform its conduct in servicing and collecting student loans, ending unfair practices and improving its operations. In addition, the agreement requires Navient to train borrowers and public service workers on how to apply income-driven repayment plans. It also prohibits Navient from compensating customer service agents in a way that limits the amount of time they spend counseling borrowers.

Navient is also required to reform the way it handles federal Direct Loans. In addition, it will transfer its contract with the Department of Education to another company called Aidvantage, a division of Maximus Federal Services. Meanwhile, Navient will continue to service private student loans.

Students will get 30% of settlement

If you are one of the 22 percent of American students who defaulted on their student loans, you are about to get a big windfall. You will get 30% of the balance of your student loans if you qualify for a student loan settlement. However, the amount you will get depends on your lender. In some cases, the lender may agree to settle for less than what you owe. Others may agree to settle for just 50 percent of your loan balance.

For-profit college leaders are furious

The new student loan lawsuit against Corinthian has for-profit college leaders on edge. The scandal began with a study by Bay Area News Group that found nearly half of all federal loan defaults in the Bay Area were at for-profit colleges. The report said that for-profit colleges enroll roughly one-tenth of college students in the area. The lawsuit also asks the court to force Corinthian to give up all of its profits and repay investors.

According to the suit, the government did not give the for-profit colleges time to respond to borrower defense claims. As a result, the lawsuit could damage their reputations. And, some of them did not even know they had borrower defense claims. The lawsuit has also created concerns about the downstream impact of wholesale forgiveness.

As the result, the Department of Education has agreed to forgive nearly $6 billion of student loan debt. This settlement will give relief to nearly 200,000 borrowers. It also will include refunds of loan payments and adjustments to credit reports. It will also provide a list of schools that committed misconduct.

Tips For Finding Your Student Loans Number

Student Loans Number

How do you find your Student Loans Number? The student loan account number is important for several reasons. Some financial institutions may require this number before approving new credit cards or refinancing loans. It is also used for tax purposes to ensure that the student loan you claim on your tax return is actually yours. Listed below are some tips for finding your Student Loans Number. Hopefully, you’ll find this information useful.

Account number

In the United States, the National Center for Education Statistics tracks student loan data. According to the data, there are over 44.2 million students in higher education institutions, and 71 percent of those students have borrowed some form of student loan. The average student loan debt is $28,650, and the total outstanding debt for all students in the United States is over $1.48 trillion. The account number is necessary for loan servicers to identify each loan and track its payments.

Your student loan account number is typically found on monthly loan statements. It is important to note that, unlike federal student loans, private student loans are not administered by the government. The federal government lends money to a private company, which then services the loans. Consequently, it is crucial to find your account number before making any changes to your repayment plan. This information will enable you to contact the servicer and determine the most affordable and convenient repayment options.

Promissory note

The number on the Promissory Note for student loans is vital for borrowers. It provides information about the loan amount and other details of the terms. The number should also indicate whether it is a federal or private loan. Private loans are accessed through private lenders and have different terms. It is important to have an accurate Promissory Note for student loans number in order to avoid paying more than you should.

The amount borrowed in the master promissory note is the total amount a student is allowed to borrow. The borrower and lender should agree on the purpose of the loan. If possible, it is best to start making interest payments during school instead of waiting until graduation to make these payments. The borrower may also request to pay back a portion of the loan during school instead of a full repayment after graduation. The timeframe in which the repayment can be completed depends on the school and the student’s ability to make the payments.

Forbearance

If you are in a tight financial spot, forbearance on student loans is a lifesaver. This program pauses payments on federal loans for up to twelve months, clearing past dues and putting future payments on hold. But, there are conditions. If you are eligible, you must follow them carefully. The deadline for applying for forbearance is usually six to twelve months, and you need to complete the application process within those timeframes.

Although forbearance offers a temporary reprieve, it can be a costly long-term solution. If you repeatedly apply for forbearance, you risk defaulting on your loan and damaging your credit score. While forbearance is noted on your credit reports, you don’t lose your credit score. But, make sure to make payments while your application is being processed and pay any interest that accrues during that time.

Interest-only option

If you have to pay off your student loans before you graduate, you might consider the interest-only option. This loan option can help you establish good financial habits, as you will be forced to save for emergencies. However, it can also increase your financial stress as you must make payments to cover the interest you’ve accrued since you last made a payment. This type of loan payment will also delay the repayment of your debt, which is undesirable.

The advantage of paying only interest is that you’ll pay less overall, because you’ll be saving money while in school. The interest-only option can help you save at least a thousand dollars over the life of the loan. If you’re planning to graduate after six months, you might want to choose an interest-only payment plan. You’ll have fewer payments and more money at the end of the term.

Student Loans Relief – Get On Your Feet and Look For Other Options

Student Loans Relief

President Biden has extended the pause in student loan repayments, but the CARES Act has sparked a new debate. What is the best way to pay off student loans? Read on to find out. Or, get on your feet and look for other options. There are several programs that can help you. COVID is one option. The American Rescue Plan is another. It could help you if you’re struggling to make ends meet. It could also help you get your financial house in order.

Biden’s extension of student loan relief

There are a few key differences between the current and extended program. First, the extended program applies to those with less than $125,000 in annual income. Second, the new program is targeted at students who attended public colleges, and are of minority background. While the details of the program are not clear, the new extension likely will result in millions of people getting debt relief. The video is missing, but we can assume that the president’s announcement will take place in July or August, closer to when payments will resume.

American Rescue Plan

The American Rescue Plan for student loans relief reopens the CRRSAA and HEERF funds and authorizes $40 billion in emergency financial aid grants to students. These funds can be used to reduce interest rates on student loans. It is designed to help students with exceptional financial needs. Additionally, the American Rescue Plan for student loans relief aims to reduce the interest rates on existing student loans. The new law takes effect on March 13, 2020.

Get On Your Feet

New York’s Get On Your Feet for Student Loans relief bill was announced on December 29. It will begin accepting applications on December 31. The program will provide up to 24 months of federal student loan debt relief to eligible applicants. To be eligible, applicants must be residents of New York State and have graduated from an accredited college or university within the past five years. The law is based on the federal government’s repayment schedule.

COVID

COVID student loan relief has been extended until January 2021 for many federal students who have experienced financial hardship. This pause was originally set to end at the end of January 2020, but experts say that it may extend until at least January 2021, if not longer. The new administration is expected to continue this relief. Students with COVID debt may apply for private student loan relief as well. There are also additional COVID loan relief options, including emergency forbearance and waivers of late fees.

Re-Enroll to Complete

SUNY’s Re-Enroll to Complete initiative is one of many state-sponsored student loan relief programs. The program’s goal is to prevent student loan default by ensuring that students return to school and complete their degrees. Earning a degree virtually guarantees a higher income. According to the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, a bachelor’s degree earns on average $2.3 million over the course of one’s lifetime. Graduate students earn even more, with median lifetime earnings of $2.7 million and $3.3 million. Additionally, having a college degree has been associated with better health and longer life expectancy.

Student Loan Limits – What You Need to Know

Student Loans Limits

Federal student loan limits may make it difficult to pay for college. Understanding these limits can help you determine other financial options. Private student loans are another option that may allow you to cover the entire cost of attending school. In some cases, they are even available for those with no dependents. To find out if you qualify for student loans, read our guide. Below we’ve outlined the maximum amount that you can borrow based on your age and the type of loan you need.

Student loan limits increase from $5,500 for freshmen to $6,500 for sophomores to $7,500 for juniors and seniors

The maximum amount a student can borrow is determined by the year they start college and the type of loan they qualify for. Undergraduates can borrow up to $12,500 a year or $57,500 for a total federal student loan. Graduate students can borrow up to $20,500 per year or $138,500 total. Calculate how much money you need for college based on your anticipated income. Try to borrow just below the maximum amount.

Federal student loan limits adjust based on dependents

Depending on the type of student you are, federal student loan limits can vary greatly. The federal student loan limits for undergraduates range from $5,500 to $7,500 for an independent student to $31,000 for students with dependents. These limits also apply to the federal parent-child PLUS loan program. For each of these programs, the federal student loan limits adjust based on the type of student. The maximum amount of unsubsidized loans is $20,500 for undergraduates, and it is $138,500 for graduate students.

Type of loan

The Type of Student Loan that is best for you depends on your financial need and the length of time you plan to attend school. Direct Subsidized Loans are available for undergraduates and graduate students with financial need. The government pays the interest on subsidized loans while you are in school, and during deferment and grace periods. Unsubsidized loans are for students who do not demonstrate need, but need financial assistance. In either case, the amount of interest you owe cannot exceed the cost of attendance.

Year you’re in school

For the purposes of calculating your student loan limits, the minimum period of enrollment is the length of your academic year or the length of your clock-hour program. Unless you are enrolled in a non-term program, you cannot borrow more than the amount of your program’s academic year limit. There are exceptions to this rule, such as if you transfer schools or leave one program to enroll in another.

Interest rates

Various types of federal loans have different rates and loan limits. Federal Stafford loans, for example, don’t require financial need and are available to undergraduate, graduate, and professional degree students. The federal government charges a 1.057 percent fee for these loans. These loans can be obtained after Oct. 1 of this year but before Oct. 1 of 2022. Federal Stafford loans are subsidized by the U.S. Department of Education during the six-month grace period. In the regular repayment period, the borrower pays the interest. A lifetime maximum amount is $23,000 for federal Stafford loans.

Private student loan options

Undergraduate and graduate students, in general, are allowed to borrow less money than undergraduates. This is because graduate-level education is generally more expensive, and older students are less likely to have financial support from their parents. In some cases, the government will even pay the interest charges on a student’s private student loan. However, students should consider the loan limits when choosing a student loan. These limits apply to both federal and private loans.

Student Loans Deferred Again – Good News For Defaulters

There’s good news for students in default on federal student loans. Under the Biden administration, they will be allowed to resume payments without incurring late fees. The pause will end in 10 months, but collections won’t resume until that time. The Education Department requires borrowers to work with default-focused loan servicing companies to find affordable payment plans. Once approved, borrowers must make nine affordable payments within 20 days of their due date, over a period of ten consecutive months. During this pause, borrowers must coordinate with a default-focused loan servicing company to make their nine affordable monthly payments. The Biden administration will waive the rehabilitation process for borrowers who are eligible to borrow up to $7,000 from the federal government.

Interest is waived on student loans

If you’ve received a federal student loan, you’re probably aware of the zero percent interest rate. The interest waiver will end on Aug. 31. However, it doesn’t take effect until then. Many lenders have already lowered interest rates and are offering refinancing options to students. Those with high interest debt will also benefit from this program, as the waiver is available to all borrowers regardless of their credit history.

The suspension of involuntary collections for defaulted student loans has been extended by the Biden administration through January 31, 2022. Previously, the paused payments were scheduled to expire on March 31, 2020. This program is intended to help defrauded borrowers avoid foreclosure by waiving their interest. It also applies to Federal Family Education Loans, which are serviced by a commercial lender. However, there are certain conditions to the loan forbearance program.

Payments have been paused since March 2020

Biden is facing mounting pressure from consumer advocates and other Democrats to extend the pause. He has promised to extend the pause through the end of this year, but many experts expect him to issue another extension in the coming months. The pause is currently only applicable to Direct Loans and PLUS loans, which are made to graduate students and parents on behalf of their children. Federal Family Education Loans are not affected.

During the pause, the Department of Education will allow borrowers who are in default to have a fresh start in their repayment. The pause is meant to erase the negative impact of default and delinquency, so borrowers can enter repayment with a clean slate. Previously, the department said that borrowers should receive a billing statement at least 21 days before their next payment is due. However, borrowers who are on auto-payment plans should contact their loan servicing company to make sure they do not miss a payment.

Extensions to Jan. 31, 2021

The White House on Tuesday signaled that another extension was on the way after the Education Department instructed student loan servicers to stop sending notices to borrowers about a May resumption. That means students can stop paying their loans until the government deems them eligible to start repaying them. The decision to extend the student loan repayment moratorium is a positive step for students, but it does not go far enough to solve the nation’s student loan crisis.

As a result of this latest action, borrowers with federal student loans will continue to enjoy the same benefits as those who are currently under forbearance. Interest will not accrue on the loans for the next 2.5 years, and wage garnishment will not be used to reduce their tax refunds. The extension will also help federal borrowers avoid delinquency and defaults. Moreover, the Department of Education will continue to offer loan relief to borrowers who have been defrauded by their financial institutions.

Student Loans Vs Personal Loans

While students usually think of college as a low-expenditure period, college expenses are often higher than what is covered by a student loan. While student loans are intended to cover educational costs, they do not cover basic living expenses, such as food and lodging. Often students do not have sufficient funds to pay for their rent or other expenses, and personal loans are the next logical step. Student loans are protected by the federal government, and interest rates are lower. Students who take out a personal loan must pay the loan back immediately, however.

Student loans are protected by the federal government

Most student loans are held by a lender, quasi-governmental agency, or third-party loan servicing company, rather than the federal government. Although the federal government protects the government-backed loans, private loans are less favorable. They typically carry higher interest rates and fees, and are not dischargeable through bankruptcy. There are no loan limits for private loans, and the interest rate is higher than on federal loans. In addition, private student loans may have higher loan fees and penalties.

They have lower interest rates

Aside from being more affordable, student loans also offer higher flexibility. Instead of repaying the loan in one lump sum, you can pay it back over a period of time in installments, each consisting of both interest and principal. You may be able to defer payment if your monthly income is low, but not all private lenders offer this option. Personal loans may be an option if you have an unexpected emergency that requires you to pay back a large sum of money in a short period of time.

They offer deferred payments

A deferred payment plan is one way of extending a credit line. Sometimes, a creditor offers a deferred payment plan for the first six months of a new customer’s account. In this case, the customer only pays interest on the credit card balance during this period and then makes regular payments after that. The deferred payment plan may be a great way for a creditor to attract new customers.

They are easier to discharge than other consumer debts

Bankruptcy is often used to eliminate other types of debt, including credit card bills, but student loans are harder to eliminate. Despite being easier to discharge than other consumer debts, they are also not completely wiped out. Although most consumer debts are non-dischargeable, student loans aren’t. In fact, they are among the few debts that can’t be eliminated through bankruptcy.

Private student loan United States | HOW TO GET Private student loan IN THE USA | CAPTAIN GAMING BD

INFORMATION SOURCE📡 : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_student_loan_(United_States) …………………………………………………… A private student loan is a financing option for higher education in the United States that can supplement, but should not replace, federal loans, such as Stafford loans, Perkins loans and PLUS loans. Private loans,…

INFORMATION SOURCE📡 : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_student_loan_(United_States)
……………………………………………………
A private student loan is a financing option for higher education in the United States that can supplement,
but should not replace, federal loans, such as Stafford loans,
Perkins loans and PLUS loans. Private loans, which are heavily advertised,
do not have the forbearance and deferral options available with federal loans (which are never advertised). In contrast with federal subsidized loans,
interest accrues while the student is in college, although repayment may not begin until after graduation. While unsubsidized federal loans do have interest charges while the student is studying, private student loan rates are often higher, sometimes much higher. Fees vary greatly, and legal cases have reported collection charges reaching 50% of amount of the loan.[citation needed] Since 2011, most private student loans are offered with zero fees,
effectively rolling the fees into the interest rates.

The increase in use of private student loans came about around 2001 once the increase in the cost of education began to exceed the increase in the amount of federal student aid available.[citation needed]

The recent history of student loans has been compared to the history of the mortgage industry.[citation needed] Similar to the way in which mortgages were securitized and sold off by lenders to investors, student loans were also sold off to investors, thereby eliminating the risk of loss for the actual lender.

Another parallel between the student loan industry and the mortgage industry is the fact that subprime lending has run rampant over the past few years.[citation needed] Just as little documentation was needed to take out a subprime mortgage loan,
even less was needed to take out a subprime or “non-traditional” student loan.

After the passage of the bankruptcy reform bill of 2005, even private student loans are not discharged during bankruptcy. This provided a credit-risk-free loan for the lender, averaging 7 percent a year.[3]

In 2007, the then-Attorney General of New York State, Andrew Cuomo, led an investigation into lending practices and anti-competitive relationships between student lenders and universities. Specifically, many universities steered student borrowers to “preferred lenders” which resulted in those borrowers incurring higher interest rates. Some of these “preferred lenders” allegedly rewarded university financial aid staff with “kickbacks.” This has led to changes in lending policy at many major American universities.
Many universities have also rebated millions of dollars in fees back to affected borrowers.[4][5]

The biggest lenders, Sallie Mae and Nelnet are criticized by borrowers. They frequently find themselves embroiled in lawsuits, the most serious of which was filed in 2007. The False Claims Suit was filed on behalf of the federal government by former Department of Education researcher, Dr. Jon Oberg, against Sallie Mae, Nelnet, and other lenders. Oberg argued that the lenders overcharged the U.S. Government and defrauded taxpayers of millions of dollars. In August 2010, Nelnet settled the lawsuit and paid $55 million.

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